tax / 17 posts found

Is The IRS Your Puppet Master?

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Feel like the IRS is your Puppet Master? Put an end to your IRS problems and call Creative Tax at (562) 251-1300..  Audits, Collections, Amended Returns  it does not matter … We Can help!

Living Trusts: Why Anna Got One

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Don't get stuck with paying high estate taxes and fees.Call us and learn about How Our  Living Trust packages can not only save you money but give you peace of mind  Call us we can help (562) 251-1300   

Complete List of Taxes In The Affordable Health Care Act (Obama Care)

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It has begun. One of the most comprehensive tax bills has been passed. profile cover1. But it is also a huge tax reform bill. Over 35 new taxes and fees have been created by this bill. Many will affect you not just corporate America

This is a list of new Obama Care taxes. Collectively they are supposed to raise over $800 billion by 2022.

These Taxes May Not Directly Affect the Average American

2.3% Tax on Medical Device Manufacturers 2014

10% Tax on Indoor Tanning Services 2014

• Blue Cross/Blue Shield Tax Hike

Excise Tax on Charitable Hospitals which fail to comply with the requirements of Obama Care

• Tax on Brand Name Drugs

• Tax on Health Insurers

Six Tips on Gambling Income and Losses

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GamblingWhether you roll the dice, play cards or bet on the ponies, all your winnings are taxable. The IRS offers these six tax tips for the casual gambler.

1. Gambling income includes winnings from lotteries, raffles, horse races and casinos. It also includes cash and the fair market value of prizes you receive, such as cars and trips.

2. If you win, you may receive a Form W-2G, Certain Gambling Winnings, from the payer. The form reports the amount of your winnings to you and the IRS. The payer issues the form depending on the type of gambling, the amount of winnings, and other factors. You’ll also receive a Form W-2G if the payer withholds federal income tax from your winnings.

3. You must report all your gambling winnings as income on your federal income tax return. This is true even if you do not receive a Form W-2G.

Keep Tax and Financial Records Safe in Case of a Natural Disaster

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thHurricanes, tornadoes, floods and other natural disasters are more common in the summer. The IRS encourages you to take a few simple steps to protect your tax and financial records in case a disaster strikes.

Here are five tips from the IRS to help you protect your important records:

1. Backup Records Electronically.  Keep an extra set of electronic records in a safe place away from where you store the originals. You can use an external hard drive, CD or DVD to store the most important records. You can take these with you to keep your copies safe. You may want to store items such as bank statements, tax returns and insurance policies.

2. Document Valuables.  Take pictures or videotape the contents of your home or place of business. These may help you prove the value of your lost items for insurance claims and casualty loss deductions. Publication 584, Casualty, Disaster and Theft Loss Workbook, can help you determine your loss if a disaster strikes.

Work Opportunity Tax Credit Extended

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tax credit2The American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 (ATRA) (H.R. 8) extends the Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) for hiring certain workers through Dec. 31, 2013.

The VOW to Hire Heroes Act of 2011 made changes to the Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC), including adding new categories to the qualified veterans targeted group and expanding the WOTC to make a reduced credit available to tax-exempt organizations for hiring qualified veterans. The VOW Act also extended the WOTC for qualified veterans hired before Jan.1, 2013.  The other targeted group categories were not extended by the VOW Act and expired for targeted group members other than qualified veterans hired after Dec.31, 2011. 

ATRA extends the WOTC for qualified veterans hired before Jan. 1, 2014.  ATRA also extends the WOTC for targeted group members, other than qualified veterans, hired after Dec.31, 2011, and before Jan.1, 2014.     

Pre-screening and Certification Requirements

All employers must obtain certification that an individual is a member of a targeted group, before the employer may claim the WOTC. The process for certifying the veterans for this credit is the same for all employers. To obtain certification, employers must file Form 8850, Pre-Screening Notice and Certification Request for the Work Opportunity Credit. 

Normally, an eligible employer must file Form 8850, Pre-Screening Notice and Certification Request for the Work Opportunity Credit, with their respective state workforce agency within 28 days after the eligible worker begins work. However, as discussed below, the IRS has provided special transition rules for the recent legislative changes. 

The IRS 2013 Dirty Dozen Tax Scams

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Property-Managers-Landlords-Real-Estate-Investors-IRS-Releases-the-Dirty-Dozen-Tax-Scams-for-2013Each year the IRS publishes a list of the top 12 tax scams that people need to be aware of. This year’s list puts identity theft at the top. So please be careful with how you give out information these days. Many of these schemes peak during filing season as people prepare their tax returns but unscrupulous people never rest so be ever vigilant.

"This tax season, the IRS has stepped up its efforts to protect taxpayers from a wide range of schemes, including moving aggressively to combat identity theft and refund fraud," said IRS Acting Commissioner Steven T. Miller. "The Dirty Dozen list shows that scams come in many forms during filing season. Don't let a scam artist steal from you or talk you into doing something you will regret later."

Illegal scams can lead to significant penalties and interest and possible criminal prosecution. IRS Criminal Investigation works closely with the Department of Justice (DOJ) to shutdown scams and prosecute the criminals behind them.

The following are the Dirty Dozen tax scams for 2013:

1. Identity Theft

Tax fraud through the use of identity theft tops this year’s Dirty Dozen list. Identity theft occurs when someone uses your personal information such as your name, Social Security number (SSN) or other identifying information, without your permission, to commit fraud or other crimes. In many cases, an identity thief uses a legitimate taxpayer’s identity to fraudulently file a tax return and claim a refund.

Special Tax Benefits for Armed Forces Personnel

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dog tagsIf you’re a member of the U.S. Armed Forces, the IRS wants you to know about the many tax benefits that may apply to you. Special tax rules apply to military members on active duty, including those serving in combat zones. These rules can help lower your federal taxes and make it easier to file your tax return. 

Here are ten of those benefits:

1. Deadline Extensions.  Qualifying military members, including those who serve in a combat zone, can postpone some tax deadlines. This includes automatic extensions of time to file tax returns and pay taxes.

2. Combat Pay Exclusion.  If you serve in a combat zone, you can exclude certain combat pay from your income. You won’t need to show the exclusion on your tax return because qualified pay isn’t included in the wages reported on your Form W-2, Wage and Tax Statement. Some service outside a combat zone also qualifies for this exclusion.

3. Earned Income Tax Credit.  You can choose to include nontaxable combat pay as earned income to figure your EITC. You would make this choice if it increases your credit. Even if you do, the combat pay remains nontaxable.

4. Moving Expense Deduction.  If you move due to a permanent change of station, you may be able to deduct some of your unreimbursed moving costs.

5. Uniform Deduction.  You can deduct the costs and upkeep of certain uniforms that regulations prohibit you from wearing while off duty. You must reduce your expenses by any reimbursement you receive for these costs.

Standard Mileage Rates for 2013

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imagesThe Internal Revenue Service today issued the 2013 optional standard mileage rates used to calculate the deductible costs of operating an automobile for business, charitable, medical or moving purposes.

Beginning on Jan. 1, 2013, the standard mileage rates for the use of a car (also vans, pickups or panel trucks) will be:

  • 56.5 cents per mile for business miles driven.
  • 24 cents per mile driven for medical or moving purposes.
  • 14 cents per mile driven in service of charitable organizations.

The rate for business miles driven during 2013 increases 1 cent from the 2012 rate. The medical and moving rate is also up 1 cent per mile from the 2012 rate.

The standard mileage rate for business is based on an annual study of the fixed and variable costs of operating an automobile. The rate for medical and moving purposes is based on the variable costs.

Taxpayers always have the option of calculating the actual costs of using their vehicle rather than using the standard mileage rates.

Beware of Bogus IRS Emails

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The IRS receives thousands of reports every year from taxpayers who receive emails out-of-the-blue claiming to be from the IRS. Scammers use the IRS name or logo to make the message appear authentic so you will respond to it. In reality, it’s a scam known as “phishing,” attempting to trick you into revealing your personal and financial information. The criminals then use this information to commit identity theft or steal your money.   The IRS has this advice for anyone who receives an email claiming to be from the IRS or directing you to an IRS site: Do not reply […]